Religion and the Decline of Magic: Studies in Popular Beliefs in Sixteenth and Seventeenth-Century England (Penguin History)

£9.9
FREE Shipping

Religion and the Decline of Magic: Studies in Popular Beliefs in Sixteenth and Seventeenth-Century England (Penguin History)

Religion and the Decline of Magic: Studies in Popular Beliefs in Sixteenth and Seventeenth-Century England (Penguin History)

RRP: £99
Price: £9.9
£9.9 FREE Shipping

In stock

We accept the following payment methods

Description

Yet, in Britain, too, major change was afoot in the profession and the primacy of politics was already being resisted by the Marxist school.

The anecdotal foundations of RDM and this practice of collecting take us to Thomas’s famous envelopes and the moment when, ‘tipping out my notes onto the table’ in a friend’s cottage in Herefordshire, the writing of RDM began. RDM’s often neglected subtitle — ‘ Studies in Popular Beliefs in Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century England’ — is notable in this regard. Its postgraduate body had ballooned in line with the general expansion of higher education, and for the first time a critical mass of early modernists — then a novel periodization — had formed. Indeed, one may not expect the final chapter of a work apparently devoted to the decline of magic to conclude that ‘the role of magic in modern society may be more extensive than we yet appreciate’ and to predict, as its final line, that ‘no society will ever be free from it’.In taking popular religion seriously, RDM rode a new wave of scholarship, one that has since become a standard way of approaching early modern religion. Although seemingly an attempt to avoid ‘the charge of untypicality’, for Thompson this method produced only ‘the gross reiterative impressionism of a computer’. Technological and socioeconomic improvements were also rendering some forms of magic less crucial to everyday life. This discovery, which led Thomas to mine the rich veins of Lilly’s casebooks for astrological and, eventually, witchy ore, makes for a compelling beginning for RDM and, by grounding it in the university’s manuscript and rare book collections, further underscores Thomas’s emphasis on the book’s Oxford origins.

Finally, and perhaps most importantly, a growing, educated class united around mockery of supernatural belief­­—increasingly represented as the preserve of the credulous masses­­—to cement their developing identity. As we have indicated, over the past fifty years RDM has managed to withstand the shifting sands of early modern historiography remarkably well. Josephson-Storm in The Myth of Disenchantment (2017), to tracing the rise and fall of this dying paradigm itself. Thomas’s manifesto earlier that year had belittled as ‘misguided’ Trevor-Roper’s concerns about ‘the creeping paralysis of professionalism’.Individually these vignettes delight; collectively they inspire wonder, especially amongst younger scholars, about the possibility of assembling such a huge corpus of evidence before the digital revolution. it’s a testament to his insight­­ and his influence­­ that many of his broad brush strokes can still be seen in today’s scholarship.



  • Fruugo ID: 258392218-563234582
  • EAN: 764486781913
  • Sold by: Fruugo

Delivery & Returns

Fruugo

Address: UK
All products: Visit Fruugo Shop